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Archive for September, 2008

BULLETIN: CREVE COEUR NATURE LOSS

Despite the recent inundation of the flood plain adjacent to Creve Coeur Park by the torrential rains of Hurricane Ike, local officials continue to pursue the development of the area. They want a Wal-Mart, a strip mall, parking lots and big box stores. Chesterfield Strip Mall Redux (see archives)

Flooding in Creve Coeur Lake's Boathouse

Flooding in Creve Coeur Lake's Boathouse

The Maryland Heights Planning & Zoning Commission recently changed the zoning of the area known as Howard Bend Flood Zone to Mixed Use in an effort to pave the way for developers, and to pave over plants and animals and the outdoor recreation area. It is time to start naming names in this controversy. The boaters, hikers, rowers, runners, in-line skaters and birders have had enough of the urge to desecrate one of the last remaining wetland areas in Missouri.

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BULLETIN: REPUBLICAN GREENS MIFFED

The selection of Sarah Palin as the vice presidential candidate on the McCain ticket has some Republican Greens turning Red – maybe even Blue. Palin has an atrocious record on the environment and has actually encouraged the savage slaughter of wildlife in Alaska. Roy Gerdel, who was honored on the Into-Nature Site as a Nature Nurturer of the Week (see archive) was re-elected to the Republicans for Environmental Protection (REP) Board in July. He recently resigned.

According to Gerdel, it‘s the selection of Sarah Palin that was the final straw that caused him “great consternation as to whether John McCain will be a champion for the environment.” Palin is no friend of the environment or of the bounty of nature, both plants and animals.


BULLETIN: FIGHT TO KEEP HIDDEN VALLEY OPEN

While some environmentalists take a dim view of ski resorts, the St. Louis winter recreation area known as Hidden Valley is credited as eco-friendly. Nevertheless, Wildwood officials have declared war on Hidden Valley and the land may succumb to development after this ski season.

It’s not just skiers and employees of Hidden Valley that will lose if the hilly, wooded area west of Highway 109 gets parceled for development. Hidden Valley has introduced thousands of school kids to the wonders of the outdoors in winter. Hidden Valley has provided a one-of-a-kind experience with its ski program for the disabled. Hidden Valley has joined Forest Park and the Missouri Botanical Garden with a program to provide refuge for declining bird species such as the Purple Martins.

Hidden Valley is an outdoor location that is incomparable on a moonlit night after freshly-fallen snow, although it is adept at making snow when nature falls short. It is one of the features that makes St. Louis tolerable during the long winter months. If you are outraged by the actions of the Wildwood officials and the prospect of losing this valuable outdoor asset for St. Louis, then visit  www.savehv.com to learn how you can help.

Comments are encouraged. Thank you.

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SPECIAL BULLETIN: All those interested in the future of the Creve Coeur Park area should mark Tuesday, Sept. 9, at 7 p.m., on their calendar. That’s when the Maryland Heights City Planning and Zoning Commission will take up a rezoning move that could spell the end of the nature haven and wetlands area just west of the popular county park. In nature’s place, will come bulldozers ready to pave the way for strip malls and big box stores such as Wal-Mart.

Creve Coeur Park has long been a favorite site for sailors, rowers, hikers and bikers. The area will be forever changed if new zoning is enacted, changing the area from NU (non-urban) to MXD (mixed use). Wetlands which have served as a relief area for the flooding of the Missouri River will be used foolishly for commercial developments that will inevitably go under water some time in the next 10 years after a “500-year flood.”
Outdoors enthusiasts and environmentalists may want to joint the Maryland Heights Residents for Responsible Growth on Tuesday evening in the battle to save one of the few wetlands areas left in Missouri.In an August meeting on the development plans, more than 200 people showed up – most opposed to the development.

This is not just a West County issue. This is a battle that should have nature and outdoor advocates across the St. Louis region united and raising their voices. For more information, check out www.savecrevecoeur.com

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